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Luc Girod

Old images give new insight on climate changes

How can we use aerial photos of glaciers from the 1930s to obtain new and exact information about the Earth's changing climate?  That is one of the main questions Luc Girod looked into in his doctoral thesis.

Deltakere på CEES-konferansen i 2017

Norwegian evolutionary biologists pushed the frontiers in international science

Researchers at The Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis (CEES) at the University of Oslo have delivered impressive results during their ten years of operation. They have published more than 1450 scientific papers, of which 14 in Nature and Science, about themes as diverse as the European plague and the strange cod genome. These articles have again been cited over 30 000 times.

A walrus rostrum with tusks that can be dated to c. 1200-1400 CE.

Ancient DNA reveals the extent of Norse Greenland’s trade in walrus ivory

When the explorer Erik the Red reached the southwest coast of Greenland in the 980s, he established a colony of Norwegian and Icelandic settlers that lasted for almost 500 years. A team of British and Norwegian researchers have now proved, by analysing ancient DNA, that the export of  valuable ivory from walrus tusks helped the Norse settlements to survive for centuries.

RobertLyleBarn

Pregnant women’s short-term use of paracetamol may protect the fetus

Researchers at the University of Oslo and the Norwegian Institute of Public Health have earlier found a link between pregnant women's long-term use of paracetamol, which is one of the world's most commonly used medications, and an increased incidence of ADHD among their children. But when pregnant women use only a little paracetamol, the incidence of ADHD among their children is reduced.

 

Bildet er fra en demonstrasjon i Washington DC i april 1971

The Long Peace most likely began during the Vietnam War

The famous cognitive psychologist and best-selling popular science author Steven Pinker has described the period after World War II as "The Long Peace". But statiticians Nils Lid Hjort and Céline Cunen at the University of Oslo crunched all the numbers about interstate wars and found that "The Long Peace" in fact started later – during the Vietnam War. When Pinker read about their research, he was impressed.

The strange genetics of the fish that never grows up

The world's smallest fish lives like a larvae throughout its whole life. It thrives in peat swamp forest waters that are as acidic as Coke, with the same colour as tea. But the really strange discovery is that the "baby carp" has a genome lacking a lot of important bits.

Anne Hope Jahren, Bill Hagopian, Jahren Lab

Preparing spruce for climate changes

Living spruce and fossilized bits of wood from Viking burial sites hide a number of secrets. They can be crucial in research on climate change.

Adult male Bale monkey feeding on young highland bamboo shoot.

Bamboo-eating Bale monkeys could still be saved from extinction

The Ethiopian Bale monkey looks like the recipe for an endangered animal species: They prefer to eat only one kind of bamboo, their forest habitats are shrinking, and local farmers kill monkeys trying to find food on cultivated fields. But the monkeys could still be saved, says Addisu Mekonnen.